Monday, May 11, 2020

The Art of Bonnie Lynch



The Art of Bonnie Lynch




1. Wind Vessel
Saggar fired clay
26” x 17” x 17”
Bonnie Lynch, 2019


2. Reliquary
Saggar fired clay
26” x 18” x 18”
Bonnie Lynch, 2019


3. Orb
Saggar fired clay
23” x 19” x 20”
Bonnie Lynch, 2019


4. Sphere
Saggar fired clay
19.5” x 22” x 22”
Bonnie Lynch, 2014


5. Scallop, Vertical
Saggar Fired Clay
26” x  27” x  13”
Bonnie Lynch, 2014


6. Scallop, Horizontal
Saggar Fired Clay
11.5” x  24” x  24”
Bonnie Lynch, 2014


7. Constellation
Saggar fired clay
22” x 18” x 13”
Bonnie Lynch, 2019


8. Cloud Vessel
Saggar fired clay
21” x 17” 19”
Bonnie Lynch, 2019


9. Winter Oval
Saggar fired clay
18” x 21” x 12”
Bonnie Lynch, 2019


10. Coleoptera 1
Saggar fired clay
8” x 21” x 12”
Bonnie Lynch, 2019


11. Coleoptera 2
Saggar fired clay
10” x 21” x 10”
Bonnie Lynch, 2019


12. Shell Form
Saggar fired clay
11” x 22” x 11”
Bonnie Lynch, 2019


Artist’s Statement

Beauty as an invitation to stillness may come at any moment. Whether arrested by the perfection of a Darkling beetle or the clarity of a perfect aria, beauty has the capacity to suspend the moment.  Layering clay is like this. I am interested in beauty, in the simplicity of form, and in the processes of stillness.

Early in my work I was drawn to the vessel. As ancient as earth itself, the vessel requires a quiet, focused attention to build. And importantly, through its essential nature I am able to experience space as an undeniable material unto itself, where the volume of silence surrounding the form and that held within is integral to each work. 

The large forms I place directly on the ground alter their space as well as our relationship to that space when we move around them. It is this tangibility, the making aware of oneself through form and volume, and the space we occupy, that I return to again and again. Vessel and volume, earth and air given up to the determination of fire, bring me to the place of beauty and stillness we inherently recognize.

Biography

Bonnie Lynch lives and works in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The minimal, spacious desert environment of her native West Texas has long inspired and formed her work. Eleven years in New York City furthered her career, yet ultimately she returned to the Southwest and its primary sources of her studio.

She has worked over thirty-five years in clay and has exhibited widely including the Louvre Museum, Paris, and installations in Santa Fe, New York, Austin and Houston.

Collections holding her large ceramic vessels include the Haags Gementemuseum, the Hague, Netherlands, the Menil Collection, Houston, Texas, the Judd Foundation, Marfa, Texas, the San Angelo Museum of Fine Art, San Angelo, Texas, and the Robert Wilson/Watermill Foundation, New York.

A passion for ongoing travel in Africa and Japan continues to inspire her aesthetic and focus on beauty in its manifestation of stillness and simplicity of form.

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